The Pocket Hole Drilling Jig Project Book
How to make strong, simple joints with this time-saving tool
by Danny Proulx

Softcover
215 x 280mm
126pp

Published by Popular Woodworking Books, Ohio USA

R.R.P.$36.90

ISBN 1-55870-687-3

Add to Shopping Cart

What's in my cart?

SKILLS PUBLISHING
HOME PAGE


Face-Frame and Case Joinery


Tall Bookcase


Quilt Rack


Window Bench

 

 

As reviewed in The Australian Woodworker Issue 119

Back in 1962, George Grotz, writing in his book The Furniture Doctor said: Ď...it has been well established for five or six centuries that the only way to hold furniture together is with glue. Also, you canít use screws, iron angles, or metal plates...í

As many conservators of antique furniture can attest, makers during even the most illustrious periods of furniture manufacture often used metal screws, straps and corners ó and even nails!

While itís true that a well made mortice joint is one of the strongest possible means of holding two pieces of wood together, dowel joints and, in particular, biscuit joints, are not all that far behind. And not much further behind them are pocket hole joints that can be made in seconds, using a modestly priced jig and stepped drill.

The jig is used to accurately drill a stepped hole, so that when a screw is inserted, its point goes through to pierce and hold the other piece of wood, while its head beds on the shoulder between the two hole diameters. There is nothing that precludes the additional use of glue unless, of course, it is intended that the joints should be able to be dismantled. (This is an advantage not shared by many other jointing systems.)

The Pocket Hole Drill Jig Project Book introduces the reader to several of the jigs available as well as all the important joints that can be made with them. This section of the book absorbs just 22 pages.The rest is devoted to projects: a tall bookcase, quilt rack, window bench, chest of drawers, kitchen display and storage cabinet, coffee or end table, sofa or hall table, framed mirror, pendulum wall clock and a childís wall clock.

The mainly photographic description of each project is accompanied by a well executed exploded diagram, a cutting list and, of course, a photo of the finished piece.

In keeping with the character of the pocket hole jointing system, the author uses other mechanical devices in the design of many of these projects. For example, drawers hang on proprietary metal runners and cabinet tops are secured with metal angles screwed to the top, sides or rails.

In some of the projects, the joints are shown on one of the viewed faces, the elliptical pocket holes generally filled with wood of a contrasting colour.

The text is written in a straight-forward and chatty style, while the simple designs are made even easier to construct by use of the pocket hole system.

Photos: Colour

Units of Measurement: Imperial & Metric

Contents

Introduction

Equipment and Accessories

Pocket Hole Joinery Applications

Face-Frame and Case Joinery

Tall Bookcase

Quilt Rack

Window Bench

Chest of Drawers

Kitchen Display and Storage Cabinet

Coffee and End Tables

Sofa or Hall Table

Framed Mirror

Pendulum Wall Clock

Child's Wall Clock

Suppliers
Index


Chest of Drawers


Kitchen Display and Storage Cabinet


Coffee and End Tables


Sofa or Hall Table


Framed Mirror


Pendulum Wall Clock


Child's Wall Clock