Vertical Milling in the Home Workshop
with Arnold Throp

Softcover
150 x 210mm
93pp

Published by Special Interest Model Books Ltd, Dorset England

R.R.P.$16.90

ISBN 978-0-85242-843-6

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Extract from back cover of book:

The increasing appearance of vertical milling machines in model engineers' and other small workshops has brought the versatility of this type of machine to the notice of a large and growing group of potential users, but until the first edition of this book was published in 1977 there was little available guidance for the average amateur or small user.

This third, revised edition includes descriptions of many of the very wide range of operations possible with photographed examples, plus information on machines, accessories, cutters, requirements and methods of work-holding.

About the Author - Arnold Throp enjoyed a long and successful engineering career starting with very large steam and oil engines and including high tension switchgear, mining machinery and machine tools. He has achieved over 55 years of membership of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers.

Photos: Black & White

Units of Measurement: Imperial

Contents

Chapter One - EVOLUTION OF THE VERTICAL MILLER
Early history of industrial machines: milling in the early small lathes: milling attachments for lathes circa 1920s: E.T. Westbury's experimental machine 1964: the Dore-Westbury machine 1968: currently available small machines and attachments.

Chapter Two - MILLING FLAT SURFACES
Surfaces parallel to table: simple fixed-radius flycutters: variable-radius boring head flycutting: multiple-tooth face mills: work holding: multiple-pass milling: surfaces square with table: using side of endmill.

Chapter Three - SLITTING AND CUTTING
Use of slitting saw for cutting through machinery component bosses: eccentric sheaves and straps: marine type big ends of connecting rods.

Chapter Four - KEYWAY CUTTING
Endmilling round ended 'feather' keyways: keyways on taper shafts: use of disc type cutters for plain sunken keyways: Woodruff keyways: making Woodruff cutters in the home workshop: table of suggested sizes of Woodruff keys and keyways for model engineers.

Chapter Five - FLUTING COMPONENTS OTHER THAN TOOLS
Correct form of flutes in loco connecting and coupling rods: mounting rods against angleplate for fluting: parallel flutes: taper flutes: preferred type of cutting tool.

Chapter Six - BORING
Dealing with parts too large to swing in lathe: trepanning large holes.

Chapter Seven - 'JIG-BORING'
Using the miller as a measuring machine: drilling holes at one setting of work and precise centres: engine beam: back-lash precautions: trip gear component: multi-hole boiler plates.

Chapter Eight - PROFILING
Curves on parts too large for lathe: loco frames: smokebox castings: machine pad bolts: loco connecting rods and coupling rods.

Chapter Nine - END-ROUNDING
Use of hardened filing guides deprecated: mounting work on rotary table: standard size guide plugs: anti-slip precautions: direction of feed for external and internal surfaces.

Chapter Ten - DIVIDING HEADS
Simple ungeared dividing heads: using change wheels as index plates: examples of dividing work: hexagons, squares, dog clutch teeth: avoiding odd numbers: the Myford worm-geared dividing head: avoiding backlash errors: packing block for bringing to lathe centre height: universal steady stand for Myford head: three further dividing heads.

Chapter Eleven - DIVIDING HEADS AND GEAR-CUTTING
Limitations to straight spur gears: simple head: Myford worm-geared head: tooth cutting on integral pinion: use of home made flycutters: Brown 5 Sharpe disc type cutters: selection of cutter to suit number of teeth: cutting a large coarse tooth gear: anti-slip back-up devices.

Chapter Twelve - DIVIDING HEADS AND TOOL MAKING
Fluting taps: example 5-flute Acme tap: producing a small fine tooth milling cutter with ball end: use of table stop blocks: combination of rotary table with main table movement: large 60 degree countersink fluting.

Chapter Thirteen - DIVIDING HEADS AND GRADUATED SCALES
Cutting graduation marks: use of rotary 'engraving' cutters: use of non-rotating planing type tools: use of table stops to control line lengths: graduating cylindrical scales: graduating flat angular scales: checking correct way of figuring when stamping scales.

Chapter Fourteen - CUTTER SPEEDS FOR VERTICAL MILLERS
Speeds affect time occupied on job: speeds too high may cause excessive cutter wear and chatter: rigidity of work, cutter and machine inferior as a rule to industrial conditions, dry cutting instead of lubricated: Table III gives speeds for cutters in different kinds of tasks: machine speeds may not always be suitable.

Chapter Fifteen - WORK-HOLDING WITH DIFFICULT SHAPES
Comparison with full scale engineering: use of chucking pieces on components: thin components and use of adhesives: advisability of making fixtures for difficult pieces: three-sided angleplates.

Chapter Sixteen - CHUCKS FOR MILLING CUTTERS
Never use taper shank tools or chucks without drawbar: chucks for screwed shank self-tightening collets: Clarkson chuck: Osborn Titanic chuck: Chucks for tee-headed locking cutters: Clare chucks: use of small end mills and D-bits without locking features: philosophy of 'throw-away' cutters.